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Pictures | Thu Apr 23, 2020 | 8:22pm EDT

Seattle hospital staff reflect on their coronavirus fight

Jozette Danek and David Danek, who are married and are both charge nurses in the ICU and telemetry unit, at the Swedish Medical Center Issaquah campus in Issaquah, Washington. "Thank you to our community for all your support," they say. REUTERS/David Ryder

Jozette Danek and David Danek, who are married and are both charge nurses in the ICU and telemetry unit, at the Swedish Medical Center Issaquah campus in Issaquah, Washington. "Thank you to our community for all your support," they say. REUTERS/David...more

Jozette Danek and David Danek, who are married and are both charge nurses in the ICU and telemetry unit, at the Swedish Medical Center Issaquah campus in Issaquah, Washington. "Thank you to our community for all your support," they say. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Audrey Kidd, a central service technician who cleans surgical instruments and sets up trays for the operating room, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus in Seattle, Washington. "I'm grateful for my job. I like what I do as a tech," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Audrey Kidd, a central service technician who cleans surgical instruments and sets up trays for the operating room, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus in Seattle, Washington. "I'm grateful for my job. I like what I do as a tech," she...more

Audrey Kidd, a central service technician who cleans surgical instruments and sets up trays for the operating room, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus in Seattle, Washington. "I'm grateful for my job. I like what I do as a tech," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is stressful, I have become more thankful for my team and how we have come together and supported each other," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is...more

Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is stressful, I have become more thankful for my team and how we have come together and supported each other," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Filipina Mapanao, an emergency technician that works at the COVID-19 triage entry point to make sure infections are contained, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "We are all in this together. Thank you for all donations and support," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Filipina Mapanao, an emergency technician that works at the COVID-19 triage entry point to make sure infections are contained, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "We are all in this together. Thank you for all donations and support,"...more

Filipina Mapanao, an emergency technician that works at the COVID-19 triage entry point to make sure infections are contained, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "We are all in this together. Thank you for all donations and support," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Anne Lipke, an ICU doctor who has been working during the pandemic as both an ICU doctor and as director of the Issaquah campus ICU, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am incredibly proud of both our medical response and our community's response to Covid," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Anne Lipke, an ICU doctor who has been working during the pandemic as both an ICU doctor and as director of the Issaquah campus ICU, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am incredibly proud of both our medical response and our...more

Anne Lipke, an ICU doctor who has been working during the pandemic as both an ICU doctor and as director of the Issaquah campus ICU, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am incredibly proud of both our medical response and our community's response to Covid," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Casey McGee, a materials distribution technician who has worked as the personal protective equipment warehouse tech during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Thanks to the greater Seattle area for the sheer amount of donations to help us during this tough time," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Casey McGee, a materials distribution technician who has worked as the personal protective equipment warehouse tech during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Thanks to the greater Seattle area for the sheer amount of...more

Casey McGee, a materials distribution technician who has worked as the personal protective equipment warehouse tech during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Thanks to the greater Seattle area for the sheer amount of donations to help us during this tough time," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Sarah Jaaskelainen, a nurse in the emergency department who has educated staff, developed new department processes, and screened patients for COVID-19, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm thankful for the outpouring of support from our community and the willingness and dedication of my coworkers to show up even when the job gets hard to do whatever is needed to care for our patients," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Sarah Jaaskelainen, a nurse in the emergency department who has educated staff, developed new department processes, and screened patients for COVID-19, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm thankful for the outpouring of support from...more

Sarah Jaaskelainen, a nurse in the emergency department who has educated staff, developed new department processes, and screened patients for COVID-19, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm thankful for the outpouring of support from our community and the willingness and dedication of my coworkers to show up even when the job gets hard to do whatever is needed to care for our patients," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Jennifer Hartley, a critical care nurse practitioner, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm living but I'm also grieving - for my patients, my colleagues, and my own friends - one of which who has died of COVID-19 in California. Every day I find new ways to become more resilient. That's how we survive and try to thrive,” she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Jennifer Hartley, a critical care nurse practitioner, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm living but I'm also grieving - for my patients, my colleagues, and my own friends - one of which who has died of COVID-19 in California. Every...more

Jennifer Hartley, a critical care nurse practitioner, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm living but I'm also grieving - for my patients, my colleagues, and my own friends - one of which who has died of COVID-19 in California. Every day I find new ways to become more resilient. That's how we survive and try to thrive,” she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Molly Strieker, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am so proud of the teamwork between everyone on my floor. I have confidence in them and know they have my back during these difficult times," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Molly Strieker, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am so proud of the teamwork between everyone on my floor. I have confidence in them and know they have my back during these difficult...more

Molly Strieker, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am so proud of the teamwork between everyone on my floor. I have confidence in them and know they have my back during these difficult times," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Michelle Fero, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit working as a "safety RN" that updates colleagues on changing policies and best practices for using personal protective equipment, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm thankful for all the love and support we have been receiving from the community, and for the excellent teamwork on my unit," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Michelle Fero, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit working as a "safety RN" that updates colleagues on changing policies and best practices for using personal protective equipment, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm...more

Michelle Fero, a medical-surgical nurse in the COVID-19 unit working as a "safety RN" that updates colleagues on changing policies and best practices for using personal protective equipment, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I'm thankful for all the love and support we have been receiving from the community, and for the excellent teamwork on my unit," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Adelia Aquino, a cleaner who has been tasked with cleaning rooms of COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "First, I got nervous but because every day my supervisor gave us a meeting, everything feels okay as long as I use my proper PPE I know I will be safe," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Adelia Aquino, a cleaner who has been tasked with cleaning rooms of COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "First, I got nervous but because every day my supervisor gave us a meeting, everything feels okay as long as I...more

Adelia Aquino, a cleaner who has been tasked with cleaning rooms of COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "First, I got nervous but because every day my supervisor gave us a meeting, everything feels okay as long as I use my proper PPE I know I will be safe," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Leia Parker, a registered dietician who has been working in the ICU during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am really proud of the team I get to work with every day," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Leia Parker, a registered dietician who has been working in the ICU during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am really proud of the team I get to work with every day," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Leia Parker, a registered dietician who has been working in the ICU during the pandemic, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am really proud of the team I get to work with every day," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Guy Hudson, a physician and the chief executive officer of Swedish Health Services, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am extremely proud to support and lead the effort for the response. We are all in this together," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Guy Hudson, a physician and the chief executive officer of Swedish Health Services, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am extremely proud to support and lead the effort for the response. We are all in this together," he says....more

Guy Hudson, a physician and the chief executive officer of Swedish Health Services, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I am extremely proud to support and lead the effort for the response. We are all in this together," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Juanita Willams, a housekeeper, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Every day is different, but we will soon overcome," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Juanita Willams, a housekeeper, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Every day is different, but we will soon overcome," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Juanita Willams, a housekeeper, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Every day is different, but we will soon overcome," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Jill Beauchamp, an ICU nurse working directly with COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I’m taking care of people my age. This is real, and the community should continue to help us flatten the curve," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Jill Beauchamp, an ICU nurse working directly with COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I’m taking care of people my age. This is real, and the community should continue to help us flatten the curve," she says....more

Jill Beauchamp, an ICU nurse working directly with COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "I’m taking care of people my age. This is real, and the community should continue to help us flatten the curve," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Shane O'Mahony, a physician who is an intensivist and the medical ICU director, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "So many emotions. Families cannot visit in the ICU. Some of the hardest moments are trying to connect families with their loved ones who are struggling to survive sometimes for weeks," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Shane O'Mahony, a physician who is an intensivist and the medical ICU director, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "So many emotions. Families cannot visit in the ICU. Some of the hardest moments are trying to connect families with...more

Shane O'Mahony, a physician who is an intensivist and the medical ICU director, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "So many emotions. Families cannot visit in the ICU. Some of the hardest moments are trying to connect families with their loved ones who are struggling to survive sometimes for weeks," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is stressful, I have become more thankful for my team and how we have come together and supported each other", she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is...more

Hannah Hausman, a nurse in the emergency department that works on a team of COVID-19 nurses to plan for employee safety and a surge plan for increased COVID-19 patients, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Even though this time is stressful, I have become more thankful for my team and how we have come together and supported each other", she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Noy Monserate, an ER nurse, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Working in the ER is both a scary experience and at the same time a satisfactory experience for me to be able to help those that need it most during this pandemic," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Noy Monserate, an ER nurse, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Working in the ER is both a scary experience and at the same time a satisfactory experience for me to be able to help those that need it most during this pandemic," he...more

Noy Monserate, an ER nurse, at the Swedish Medical Center First Hill campus. "Working in the ER is both a scary experience and at the same time a satisfactory experience for me to be able to help those that need it most during this pandemic," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Landi Tillis, a nurse in the acute care resource team that cares for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I got to discharge a 74-year-old patient a few days ago who was Covid positive and intubated for almost two weeks. I’ve never seen a smile so full of gratitude as he was wheeled out," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Landi Tillis, a nurse in the acute care resource team that cares for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I got to discharge a 74-year-old patient a few days ago who was Covid positive and intubated for almost...more

Landi Tillis, a nurse in the acute care resource team that cares for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I got to discharge a 74-year-old patient a few days ago who was Covid positive and intubated for almost two weeks. I’ve never seen a smile so full of gratitude as he was wheeled out," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Andre Mattus, a patient care technician in the emergency department that works as a "dofficer" to help colleagues safely doff their personal protective equipment at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Doffing PPE is the most hazardous part of our care as this is when we risk accidentally contaminating ourselves. I help doctors and nurses stay safe so that we can continue to care for our community," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Andre Mattus, a patient care technician in the emergency department that works as a "dofficer" to help colleagues safely doff their personal protective equipment at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Doffing PPE is the most...more

Andre Mattus, a patient care technician in the emergency department that works as a "dofficer" to help colleagues safely doff their personal protective equipment at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Doffing PPE is the most hazardous part of our care as this is when we risk accidentally contaminating ourselves. I help doctors and nurses stay safe so that we can continue to care for our community," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Arielle Trumble, a nurse in the operating room that works to educate colleagues on how to work with COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I have a duty of care. We're prepared for the worst as we hope for the best," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Arielle Trumble, a nurse in the operating room that works to educate colleagues on how to work with COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I have a duty of care. We're prepared for the worst as we hope for the...more

Arielle Trumble, a nurse in the operating room that works to educate colleagues on how to work with COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I have a duty of care. We're prepared for the worst as we hope for the best," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Alex Vengerovsky, an ICU physician caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Recognizing the team effort," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Alex Vengerovsky, an ICU physician caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Recognizing the team effort," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Alex Vengerovsky, an ICU physician caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Recognizing the team effort," he says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Rebecca Fulford-Foster, a pharmacy technician that provides medication for patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I personally have three high-risk people in my life that I'm worried every day I might bring this home to," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Rebecca Fulford-Foster, a pharmacy technician that provides medication for patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I personally have three high-risk people in my life that I'm worried every day I might bring this home...more

Rebecca Fulford-Foster, a pharmacy technician that provides medication for patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I personally have three high-risk people in my life that I'm worried every day I might bring this home to," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Alexandra Mariani, a nurse in oncology working with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I've been a nurse for four months. I wonder what it means for me to spend such a formative period in my career this way," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Alexandra Mariani, a nurse in oncology working with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I've been a nurse for four months. I wonder what it means for me to spend such a formative period in my career this...more

Alexandra Mariani, a nurse in oncology working with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I've been a nurse for four months. I wonder what it means for me to spend such a formative period in my career this way," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Luna Martinez, a nurse working in COVID-19 acute care at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new grad nurse and it has been a challenging but rewarding time to begin my nursing career," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Luna Martinez, a nurse working in COVID-19 acute care at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new grad nurse and it has been a challenging but rewarding time to begin my nursing career," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Luna Martinez, a nurse working in COVID-19 acute care at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new grad nurse and it has been a challenging but rewarding time to begin my nursing career," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Lauren Bloom, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Honored to serve during this exceptionally difficult time," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Lauren Bloom, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Honored to serve during this exceptionally difficult time," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Lauren Bloom, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Honored to serve during this exceptionally difficult time," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Nicole Scovil, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "These past couple weeks have been exceptionally scary for our patients since nearly all of them have no immune system. I'm really missing patients I haven't been able to visit, as they're high risk and I work with Covid patients," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Nicole Scovil, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "These past couple weeks have been exceptionally scary for our patients since nearly all of them have no immune system. I'm really missing patients I...more

Nicole Scovil, a nurse in oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "These past couple weeks have been exceptionally scary for our patients since nearly all of them have no immune system. I'm really missing patients I haven't been able to visit, as they're high risk and I work with Covid patients," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Skylar Tucker, assistant nurse manager in the Center for Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "This nice weather along with long walks outside with my dog have kept me sane," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Skylar Tucker, assistant nurse manager in the Center for Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "This nice weather along with long walks outside with my dog have kept me sane," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Skylar Tucker, assistant nurse manager in the Center for Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "This nice weather along with long walks outside with my dog have kept me sane," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Jamie Peterson, a nurse on the acute care resource team at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am proud that UWMC leadership has our backs and supports every staff member," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Jamie Peterson, a nurse on the acute care resource team at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am proud that UWMC leadership has our backs and supports every staff member," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Jamie Peterson, a nurse on the acute care resource team at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am proud that UWMC leadership has our backs and supports every staff member," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Basak Coruh, a pulmonary and critical care physician that serves COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "It's a privilege to care for the sickest patients in our community with COVID-19 and I couldn't be prouder of our team," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Basak Coruh, a pulmonary and critical care physician that serves COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "It's a privilege to care for the sickest patients in our community with COVID-19 and I couldn't be prouder...more

Basak Coruh, a pulmonary and critical care physician that serves COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "It's a privilege to care for the sickest patients in our community with COVID-19 and I couldn't be prouder of our team," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Sumalee Kraisuwan, a post-anesthesia care unit nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Cannot wait for surgery restriction to be done," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Sumalee Kraisuwan, a post-anesthesia care unit nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Cannot wait for surgery restriction to be done," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Sumalee Kraisuwan, a post-anesthesia care unit nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Cannot wait for surgery restriction to be done," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Kim Greaves, a nurse in nephrology who has been redeployed to the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am so proud to be a nurse and happy to help out where I can," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kim Greaves, a nurse in nephrology who has been redeployed to the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am so proud to be a nurse and happy to help out where I can," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kim Greaves, a nurse in nephrology who has been redeployed to the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am so proud to be a nurse and happy to help out where I can," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Elena Smith, a surgical nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Thank you for supporting our teams," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Elena Smith, a surgical nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Thank you for supporting our teams," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Elena Smith, a surgical nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Thank you for supporting our teams," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Celyn Pepino, an interventional radiology technologist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I love what I do. I get to be a part of an amazing organization that cares for its employees, patients, community," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Celyn Pepino, an interventional radiology technologist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I love what I do. I get to be a part of an amazing organization that cares for its employees, patients, community," she says....more

Celyn Pepino, an interventional radiology technologist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I love what I do. I get to be a part of an amazing organization that cares for its employees, patients, community," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Amanda Peters, a medical assistant in the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new graduate and I'm extremely happy to lend a hand during this crisis," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Amanda Peters, a medical assistant in the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new graduate and I'm extremely happy to lend a hand during this crisis," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Amanda Peters, a medical assistant in the emergency department at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "I am a new graduate and I'm extremely happy to lend a hand during this crisis," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Jonathan Sham, a physician in surgical oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "We are called to take care of the patients with cancer who can't wait until after the pandemic to get treatment, he says." REUTERS/David Ryder

Jonathan Sham, a physician in surgical oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "We are called to take care of the patients with cancer who can't wait until after the pandemic to get treatment, he says." REUTERS/David Ryder

Jonathan Sham, a physician in surgical oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "We are called to take care of the patients with cancer who can't wait until after the pandemic to get treatment, he says." REUTERS/David Ryder
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Claire Hallock, a nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake in Seattle. "The resiliency of both the staff and our patients is remarkable during this time of uncertainty," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Claire Hallock, a nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake in Seattle. "The resiliency of both the staff and our patients is remarkable during this time of uncertainty," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Claire Hallock, a nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake in Seattle. "The resiliency of both the staff and our patients is remarkable during this time of uncertainty," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Kaitlyn McDow, an ICU nurse who works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Our patients are on ventilators. It's the last stop on either getting better or passing on," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kaitlyn McDow, an ICU nurse who works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Our patients are on ventilators. It's the last stop on either getting better or passing on," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kaitlyn McDow, an ICU nurse who works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Our patients are on ventilators. It's the last stop on either getting better or passing on," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Zahra Ali, an ICU nurse caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Support local businesses," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Zahra Ali, an ICU nurse caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Support local businesses," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder

Zahra Ali, an ICU nurse caring for COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "Support local businesses," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Gretchen Rohrbaugh, a nurse in labor delivery who works with COVID-19 mothers and with babies whose mothers have COVID-19 at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "As with so many other trials, this pandemic is again proving the strength and resilience of moms," she says.  REUTERS/David Ryder

Gretchen Rohrbaugh, a nurse in labor delivery who works with COVID-19 mothers and with babies whose mothers have COVID-19 at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "As with so many other trials, this pandemic is again proving the...more

Gretchen Rohrbaugh, a nurse in labor delivery who works with COVID-19 mothers and with babies whose mothers have COVID-19 at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. "As with so many other trials, this pandemic is again proving the strength and resilience of moms," she says. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Megan Mondoro, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Megan Mondoro, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Megan Mondoro, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Taylor Martino, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Taylor Martino, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Taylor Martino, a nurse in acute care that works with COVID-19 patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Garrett Perchetti, a research scientist in the Department of Lab Medicine Division of Virology working on SARS-CoV-2 research and clinical testing at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Garrett Perchetti, a research scientist in the Department of Lab Medicine Division of Virology working on SARS-CoV-2 research and clinical testing at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Garrett Perchetti, a research scientist in the Department of Lab Medicine Division of Virology working on SARS-CoV-2 research and clinical testing at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Kamlah Zughni, a surgical nurse who works to educate the operating room staff for COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kamlah Zughni, a surgical nurse who works to educate the operating room staff for COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Kamlah Zughni, a surgical nurse who works to educate the operating room staff for COVID-19 cases at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Flabiano Macon, Jr., a patient services specialist who checks patients in and provides customer service at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Flabiano Macon, Jr., a patient services specialist who checks patients in and provides customer service at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Flabiano Macon, Jr., a patient services specialist who checks patients in and provides customer service at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Gearland Panelo, assistant nurse manager in the surgical specialties center at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Gearland Panelo, assistant nurse manager in the surgical specialties center at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Gearland Panelo, assistant nurse manager in the surgical specialties center at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Andrew Lee, supervisor in the blood draw lab that receives COVID-19 samples at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Andrew Lee, supervisor in the blood draw lab that receives COVID-19 samples at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Andrew Lee, supervisor in the blood draw lab that receives COVID-19 samples at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Samuel Warby, a public safety officer at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Samuel Warby, a public safety officer at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Samuel Warby, a public safety officer at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Abubacarr Jobe, a biomedical technician in clinical engineering who repairs and maintains medical equipment used on patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Abubacarr Jobe, a biomedical technician in clinical engineering who repairs and maintains medical equipment used on patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Abubacarr Jobe, a biomedical technician in clinical engineering who repairs and maintains medical equipment used on patients at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Nina Sharma, an ICU pharmacist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Nina Sharma, an ICU pharmacist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Nina Sharma, an ICU pharmacist at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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Holly Olivieri, an operating room nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Holly Olivieri, an operating room nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder

Holly Olivieri, an operating room nurse at the University of Washington Medical Center - Montlake. REUTERS/David Ryder
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